Adulteration In Ghee

Adulteration In Ghee: How to Check? - Shahjighee

The market price of ghee is nearly three times that of edible vegetable oils and fats. The ghee supply is also far too limited to meet demand. These price and availability disparities result in a number of mistakes.

Ghee adulteration is becoming more common in India because it boosts traders' profits while increasing supply. Ghee contains two types of adulterants:

  • vegetable oils/fats, and
  • animal body fat.

Ghee adulteration can begin during the milking process. To milk or cream, a water emulsion of coconut, groundnut, and other inexpensive oils is added. These are converted to butter by souring and churning and, as a result, to ghee by boiling butter or cream.

What is the adulteration of ghee?

The process of adding cheaper or lower-quality substances to ghee in order to increase its volume or reduce its cost is referred to as "adulteration." Vegetable oil, melted butter, vanaspati, animal fat, and hydrogenated oil are all examples of adulterants.

These substances can be harmful and may not have the same nutritional value or taste as pure ghee, so it's important to purchase ghee from a trusted source and check for signs of adulteration.

What are the main adulterants in ghee?

The most common adulterants in ghee are low-cost, low-quality oils like vegetable oil, melted butter, vanaspati, and hydrogenated oil. These ingredients can be added to ghee to increase its volume and lower its cost.

Ghee adulteration can have a negative impact on its taste, nutritional value, and quality, so it's important to buy ghee from a reputable source and look for signs of adulteration.

Can animal fats be used as ghee adulterants?

Yes, animal fat can be used as an adulterant in ghee. For example, melted butter or tallow (a type of animal fat) can be added to ghee to increase its volume and reduce its cost.

This is considered adulteration because it affects the quality and purity of the ghee and can result in the ghee not tasting or having the same nutritional value as pure ghee.

To ensure that you are purchasing pure ghee, it's important to buy it from a trusted source and check for signs of adulteration.

Why do people adulterate ghee?

People adulterate ghee for financial gain. They can increase ghee production while decreasing costs, allowing them to sell it at a higher profit margin.

Additionally, ghee is a popular and in-demand product, and some people may try to take advantage of this by selling adulterated ghee as pure ghee.

This is an unethical practice that can result in consumers purchasing a product that is of lower quality and potentially harmful to their health.

How to Detect adulteration in ghee?

How can we check whether ghee is adulterated or not? There are several ways to check if ghee is adulterated:

  • Smell and taste: Pure ghee has a distinct, rich, and nutty aroma, while adulterated ghee may have a rancid or off smell. You can also taste a small amount of the ghee to check for any unusual flavors.
  • Appearance: Pure ghee is usually clear and has a yellowish color, while adulterated ghee may appear cloudy or have a greenish tint.
  • Melting point: Pure ghee has a high melting point, while adulterated ghee will melt at a lower temperature. You can test the ghee by placing a small amount in a spoon and observing its melting behavior.
  • Lab tests: You can have a sample of the ghee tested in a laboratory to determine if it is pure or adulterated. This method is more reliable but may be more expensive.

To reduce the risk of purchasing adulterated ghee, purchase ghee from a reputable source. Always check the ingredient list, expiration date, and packaging before buying.

Also Read: How to check purity of A2 desi ghee?

1. Laboratory tests for detection of ghee adulteration

 There are several laboratory tests that can be used to determine if ghee is pure or adulterated:

  • Fatty acid analysis: This test measures the levels of different fatty acids in the ghee and can identify the presence of any non-dairy fats.
  • Rancimat test: This test measures the stability of the ghee and can detect the presence of any rancid or degraded oils.
  • Gas chromatography: This test uses gas chromatography to separate and identify the different components in the ghee, such as fatty acids, glycerol, and other impurities.
  • Refractive index test: This test measures the refractive index of the ghee, which is a measure of its density. Adulterated ghee will typically have a lower refractive index compared to pure ghee.

A qualified laboratory can perform these tests, which provide reliable results on the purity of the ghee. It is important to note that while these tests are more expensive than simple methods, they are more accurate in detecting adulteration.

2. How can we check ghee adulteration at home?

There are several simple methods that can be used to check for the adulteration of ghee at home:

  • Smell and taste: Pure ghee has a distinct, rich, and nutty aroma, while adulterated ghee may have a rancid or off smell. You can also taste a small amount of the ghee to check for any unusual flavors.
  • Appearance: Pure ghee is usually clear and has a yellowish color, while adulterated ghee may appear cloudy or have a greenish tint.
  • Melting point: Pure ghee has a high melting point, while adulterated ghee will melt at a lower temperature. You can test the ghee by placing a small amount in a spoon and observing its melting behavior.
  • Boudouin test: This test uses an iodine solution to determine the presence of any non-fatty substances in the ghee, such as water, starch, and sugar. When a small amount of iodine solution is added to ghee, it should turn blue-black if it is pure but will turn brown or yellow if it is adulterated.

While these methods can provide some indication of ghee purity, they are not always accurate, and laboratory testing can provide a more accurate result.

To reduce the risk of purchasing adulterated ghee, it is recommended to buy ghee from a reputable source and to check the ingredients list, expiration date, and packaging before purchasing.

3. Chemical test to check ghee adulteration 

ghee adulteration test

There are several chemical tests that can be used to check for ghee adulteration:

  • Refractive index test: measures the refractive index of ghee and compares it with the index of pure ghee, to detect the presence of any added substances.
  • Acid value test: measures the amount of free fatty acids present in the ghee, and can indicate the presence of oils or fats that have been added to the ghee.
  • Saponification value test: measures the amount of soap that can be produced from the ghee and can indicate the presence of oils or fats that have been added to the ghee.
  • Iodine value test: measures the amount of iodine absorbed by ghee, and can indicate the presence of oils or fats that have been added to the ghee.
  • Melting point test: measures the melting point of ghee and compares it with the melting point of pure ghee, to detect the presence of any added substances.

It is critical to note that the results of these tests should be interpreted by a trained analyst and confirmed with additional tests, as certain substances may interfere with the results.

Also Read;

Conclusion 

In conclusion, the adulteration of ghee is a common issue that affects the quality and safety of this popular food product. But we solve this problem, we has been providing mother's hand desi ghee since 1957 with 100% made with traditional bilona method.

So you can bring pure mother's hand made desi ghee to your home from Shahji Ghee
sahiwal cow ghee
A2 Sahiwal Cow Ghee
gir cow ghee
A2 Gir Cow Ghee
buy now
buy gir cow ghee
RuffRuff App RuffRuff App by Tsun
Back to blog

Leave a comment

Please note, comments need to be approved before they are published.